How long cocaine stays in your system is a very difficult proposition to calculate. The reason for this uncertainty is due to several different factors, most of which have to do with the person ingesting it. A person’s body weight, a person’s body mass index, a person’s metabolic rate, the amount of the cocaine substance used, the frequency of cocaine use, and the potency of the cocaine ingested are just some of the variables to consider when figuringhow long does cocaine stays in your system.

However, the major problem to consider when calculating how long cocaine stays in your system is which part of your system are we talking about. Apparently there is new data to suggest that cocaine by-products more commonly known as metabolites “Benzoylecgonine” can linger in certain parts of your body for periods of time far greater than the 2 to 3 day timeframe that most people believe to be accurate.

The Controlled Substances Act of 1970 divided substances to be regulated into 5 schedules or groupings. These schedules govern the legal distribution and use of most substances with a significant abuse potential. Schedule 1 substances have a high abuse potential and have no approved medical use. Most of the popular street drugs like marijuana and heroin are grouped into Schedule 1. Cocaine is grouped in Schedule 2, which means that drugs in this grouping have some known medicinal value. This is significant because once a drug has an established medical usage it is studied much more thoroughly. Because Marijuana is a Schedule 1 drug and determined to have no known medical use, there is a definite lack of scientific data on many of its properties, and therefore it is incredibly difficult to determine how long it stays in your system. Cocaine however has been examined by scientists and has had numerous studies published on its medical value in some of this country’s most esteemed journals of medicine.

Drug testing can detect the presence of cocaine in your system for a few days, but most drug tests don’t actually test for the drugs by themselves, they test for the metabolites that our bodies produce after the ingestion of drugs.  Cocaine is similar to all substances that enter the body in the regard that they all must be digested, broken down, separated, and then delivered to the appropriate place within the body for processing and finally, removal.  Once it enters your system, your body begins to break it down through the metabolism process.  Metabolism is the series of processes that occur in our bodies by which food and other substances are converted into the energy and products needed to sustain life.  Metabolites are the by-products left over after substances go through the metabolic process.  So even though cocaine might fully exit the body after 2 to 3 days, its metabolite “Benzoylecgonine” can still be detected for weeks in many cases depending on some of the previously mentioned variables.  There is also a recent study that found that the presence of Benzoylecgonine can be retained in the human body for a period of 25 years.  However, the cost of a drug test that would actually be able to detect Benzoylecgonine for such a long period of time after ingestion would be far too cost prohibitive to be utilized by drug testing companies today or in the near future.

The metabolite “Benzoylecgonine” produced after the ingestion of cocaine differs from that of marijuana in the regard that Benzoylecgonine is water soluble and therefore passed out of the body more quickly. Benzoylecgonine is primarily metabolized by the liver and then excreted through our kidneys and then out of our system in our feces and urine.  The remaining metabolites that do not easily pass through our body’s excretion process ultimately end up stored in our body’s fat cells.  A person’s body mass index or more commonly, their body fat percentage, is a major factor to consider when figuring out how long cocaine and its metabolites stay in our system.  The more fat a person has in them directly correlates into how many metabolites reside in our body, and hence, how long the evidence of cocaine use will continue to show up in our urine.So to be clear, people that carry a higher percentage of body fat will continue to excrete evidence of cocaine usage for longer than someone who is relatively skinny with a low percentage of body fat.

The frequency of cocaine use and the potency of the particular cocaine used are the next major factors to consider when calculating how long does cocaine stays in your system.  A person who uses cocaine on a daily basis is going to have more metabolites stored in whatever percentage of body fat that they have, as opposed to someone that uses cocaine less frequently than every day.  Since the body is always removing these metabolites through the metabolism process, someone that is constantly reinforcing the amount of cocaine metabolites stored and removed from their fat fells is going to show signs of cocaine usage for longer than the casual user.  The potency of the cocaine is also an important factor to consider when determining how long cocaine stays in our body.  The cocaine currently found in the United States has a purity level of around 60%, which is significantly lower than the 72% back in 2000.  Since cocaine comes in so many different strengths, and since these strengths or potency levels are not printed on a label, it is relatively impossible to know exactly what degree of purity of cocaine a person is ingesting when using cocaine.  If a casual user were to ingest an incredibly potent strain of cocaine, it would have the same effect in a person’s fat, as if a daily user were to ingest a less potent strain of cocaine.  This is one of the reasons that nobody can accurately predict how long cocaine actually stays in the body.

Now that we have covered the major factors that contribute to how long cocaine stays in your system, we can now extrapolate with a clearer degree of certainty how long the body will continue to show evidence of cocaine usage.  It has been suggested that evidence of cocaine usage can be detected by drug testing for up to 3 days in most instances. This time frame is not accurate in many cases.  Some people can show evidence of cocaine usage for periods of time far greater than 3 days, in some cases up to 30 days.  The graph below shows how long most users can expect to see evidence of cocaine use in their body.  The graph presumes an average cocaine purity level of around 60% ingested by the user.

cocaine in the system

 

How long cocaine and its metabolites “Benzoylecgonine” can be detected in a person’s hair is an easier proposition to calculate.  Human hair is like a record of what we eat, drink, inhale, and even where we live.  As mentioned previously, cocaine and its metabolite Benzoylecgonine are all eventually excreted through our urine and feces.  The presence of metabolites in the hair is based on the same premise.  The bloodstream circulates metabolites throughout the body, and since our bloodstream nourishes developing hair follicles, metabolites are deposited in the hair follicle where they become trapped in the hair shaft as it grows out from the follicle.  Hair on average grows a ½ inch every 30 days.  So if your hair is 1 ½ inches long, cocaine and its metabolites will be detected for up to 90 days.  However, if you have long hair, cocaine usage can be detected for quite a bit longer.  You may have stopped using cocaine a long time ago, but evidence of your usage will still be detectable until you cut your hair and start over again.

Please consider that there is no definitive time table on how long evidence of cocaine usage stays in the body.  As previously mentioned, many factors contribute to how long we store and expel cocaine metabolites in and from the body.  We understand how important it is for people to know exactly when they are clean and free from evidence of cocaine usage due to the intrusive nature of corporations and the criminal justice system.  We hope that this article has shed a little light on this important subject.

 

There is no way to state with complete accuracy how long marijuana will stay in your system after ingestion. The reason for this lack of scientific certainty is due to several different factors, most of which have to do with the specific person ingesting it. Some of the factors to consider when asking how long marijuana stay in your system depend on a wide array of variables ranging from the method of intake, a person’s weight, a person’s body mass index, a person’s metabolic rate, the amount of the substance used, the frequency of use, and finally the potency of the particular strain of cannabis used. This article will attempt to explain the entire process that occurs when marijuana is introduced into your body, and how it is ultimately broken down and purged from your system. Even though there are relatively few studies conducted and published from the scientific community on this subject, we at least know some basic information that has been gathered from a variety of sources.

Marijuana is similar to all substances that enter the body in the regard that they all must be digested, broken down, separated, and then delivered to the appropriate place within the body for processing and finally, removal. Marijuana is most commonly ingested by smoking it, though there are other ways to introduce it into your system. Once it enters your system, your body begins to break it down through the metabolism process. Metabolism is the series of processes that occur in our bodies by which food and other substances are converted into the energy and products needed to sustain life. The chemical found in marijuana is called THC or Tetrahydrocannabinol. THC is primarily metabolized by the liver and then excreted through our kidneys and then out of our system in our feces and urine. The remaining THC metabolites that do not easily pass through our body’s excretion process ultimately end up stored in our bodies fat cells. THC isn’t water soluble, which is another way of saying that THC doesn’t dissolve in water. This is significant because THC isn’t broken down easily or quickly by the abundance of water that exists in our bodies, so it remains in our bodies fat cells much longer than other drug metabolites that are water soluble. A person’s body mass index or more commonly, their body fat percentage, is a major factor to consider when figuring out how long marijuana stays in our system. The more fat a person has in them directly correlates into how many metabolites reside in our body, and hence, how long the evidence of marijuana use will continue to show up in our urine. So to be clear, people that carry a higher percentage of body fat will continue to excrete evidence of marijuana usage for longer than someone who is relatively skinny with a low percentage of body fat.

The frequency of marijuana use and the potency of the particular marijuana used are the next major factors to consider when calculating how long marijuana stays in our system. A person who uses marijuana on a daily basis is going to have more metabolites stored in whatever percentage of body fat that they have, as opposed to someone that uses marijuana less frequently than every day. Since the body is always removing these metabolites through the metabolism process, someone that is constantly reinforcing the amount of THC metabolites stored and removed from their fat fells is going to show signs of marijuana usage for longer than the casual user. The potency of the marijuana is also an important factor to consider when determining how long marijuana stays in our body. The marijuana currently found in the United States has a THC concentration of around 8.5%, which is significantly higher than the 3.5% back in 1990. It has been estimated that the marijuana sold in coffee shops throughout Holland has a THC concentration of around 19 percent. Since marijuana comes in so many different strengths, and since these strengths or potency levels are not printed on a label, it is relatively impossible to know exactly what level of THC concentration a person is ingesting when using marijuana. If a casual user were to smoke an incredibly potent strain of marijuana, it would have the same effect on THC content in a person’s fat, as if a chronic or daily user were to smoke a less potent strain of marijuana. This is one of the reasons that nobody can accurately predict how long marijuana actually stays in the body.

Now that we have covered the major factors that contribute to how long marijuana stays in our system, we can now extrapolate with a clearer degree of certainty how long the body will continue to show evidence of marijuana usage. It has been suggested that evidence of marijuana usage can be detected by drug testing for up to 30 days in most cases. This time frame is not accurate in many cases. Some people can show evidence of marijuana usage for periods of time far greater than 30 days, in some cases up to 90 days. The graph below shows how long most users can expect to see evidence of marijuana use in their body. The graph presumes a THC concentrate of around 10% in the marijuana ingested by the user.

How long marijuana can be detected in a person’s hair is a much easier proposition to calculate. Human hair is like a record of what we eat, drink, inhale, and even where we live. As mentioned earlier, marijuana metabolites are all eventually excreted through our urine and feces. The presence of metabolites in the hair is based on the same premise. The bloodstream circulates metabolites throughout the body, and since our bloodstream nourishes developing hair follicles, metabolites are deposited in the hair follicle where they become trapped in the hair shaft as it grows out from the follicle. Hair on average grows 1/2 an inch every 30 days. So if your hair is 1.5 inches long then marijuana use is detectable up to 90 days. Marijuana can be detected even longer with long hair.

There is no exact scientific formula for calculating how long vicodin stays in your system. There are several variables to consider when attempting to ascertain how long a person’s body will show evidence of vicodin usage. Most of the different variables to consider when figuring out how long vicodin stays in your system are directly correlated to the person who has ingested the vicodin. A person’s weight, a person’s body mass index, a person’s metabolic rate, the amount of vicodin ingested, the frequency of use, the length of consistent use, and finally the strength of the vicodin, are the key factors to consider when figuring out how long evidence of vicodin usage will stay in a person’s system.

Vicodin is a trademarked brand narcotic painkiller containing hydrocodone and acetaminophen. Hydrocodone is classified as an opiate because it is derived from one of the many different narcotic alkaloids found in the opium poppy. There are many different kinds of natural and synthetic opiods that are refined and sold in our nation’s pharmacies and on its street corners. Some of the better known opiates are Morphine, Codeine, Thebaine, Papaverine, Heroin, Hydrocodone, Demerol, Lortab, Oxicodone, OxiContin, Percodan, Percocet, Fentanyl, Sublimaze, Hydromorphone, Dilaudid, and Methadone, and these form the bulk of the prescribed narcotic pain killers as well as some of the most dangerous drugs found in the world.
Opiate drugs cause the user to experience a pleasant drowsy state, a lessened sensation of pain, slowed breathing, and an overall sense of euphoria. Narcotic pain killers work by blocking the path of the chemical messengers that signal pain in the spinal cord and brain.

Most opiate drugs enter the bloodstream easily because they dissolve in fatty substances which allow them to cross into cells and ultimately into the brain. Opiates are water soluble which is very significant when considering how long evidence of their use will stay in your system. Some drug metabolites like THC, which is found in marijuana, are not water soluble, and thus remain in your system for periods of time far greater than water soluble metabolites. When a substance is water soluble, it means that is breaks down and dissolves in water easily. This allows it to exit the fat cells much more rapidly causing any evidence of its usage to vanish in a fraction of the time compared to how long something like THC takes to leave your system. All substances that go through the metabolic process end up having their byproducts stored in the bodies fat cells prior to removal through the body’s excretory system, via urine, sweat, and feces. A person’s body mass index or more commonly, their body fat percentage, is a major factor when considering how long vicodin stays in your system. The more fat a person has in them directly correlates into how many metabolites reside in our body, and hence, how long evidence of vicodin use can still be detected on a drug test. So to be clear, people that carry a higher percentage of body fat will continue to excrete evidence of vicodin usage for significantly longer than someone who is relatively skinny with a low percentage of body fat.

The amount of vicodin taken, the frequency of vicodin use, the length of consistent use, and the strength of the vicodin taken are to also be considered when calculating how long vicodin stays in your system. Obviously the amount of vicodin taken will have a direct correlation on how long it will stay in your system. The more vicodin a person consumes will result in a greater number of metabolites produced, which will be stored in the body’s fat cells. The same logic can be applied when considering the frequency of vicodin usage by a person. Frequent usage of vicodin will cause a constant supply of metabolites to be stored in the body’s fat cells, thus making evidence of vicodin usage detectable for greater periods of time. Another factor to consider is the length of consistent use of vicodin. If you take vicodin often and on a consistent basis, evidence of vicodin use will continue to be detectable for longer periods of time compared to an infrequent user. Vicodin also comes in varying strengths of milligrams. The more potent the vicodin is, the longer it will stay in your system. Most vicodin contains only 5 milligrams of hydrocodone, though some vicodin has up to 10 milligrams and is sold as “Vicodin HP”.

Taking all of these factors into consideration, we can estimate with a clearer degree of certainty how long vicodin will stay in your system. The common perception is that vicodin will only stay in your system for 24 to 48 hours, and this is true in some cases. However, in cases where the user has a high percentage of body fat, or where the user had ingested a more potent vicodin, or when the user is taking vicodin on a more consistent basis, vicodin can still remain in your system for up to 7 days. The graph below presumes vicodin with a hydrocodone concentration of 7.5 milligrams.

Determining how long vicodin can be found in a person’s hair is a little easier to predict. Human hair is like a record of what we eat, drink, inhale, and even where we live. As mentioned earlier, vicodin metabolites are stored in the fat and eventually excreted through our urine and feces. The presence of vicodin metabolites in the hair is based on the same premise. The bloodstream circulates metabolites throughout the body, and since the bloodstream nourishes developing hair follicles, metabolites are deposited in the hair follicle and the hair shaft where they become trapped and then grow out with the hair. Hair grows on average of about ½ inch every 30 days. If your hair is 1½ inches long, vicodin and its metabolites can be detected for up to 90 days. If you have long hair, vicodin will be detectable for quite a long time, at least until you cut your hair and start all over again.

There is no exact scientific formula for calculating how long vicodin stays in your system. There are several variables to consider when attempting to ascertain how long a person’s body will show evidence of vicodin usage. Most of the different variables to consider when figuring out how long vicodin stays in your system are directly correlated to the person who has ingested the vicodin. A person’s weight, a person’s body mass index, a person’s metabolic rate, the amount of vicodin ingested, the frequency of use, the length of consistent use, and finally the strength of the vicodin, are the key factors to consider when figuring out how long evidence of vicodin usage will stay in a person’s system.

Vicodin is a trademarked brand narcotic painkiller containing hydrocodone and acetaminophen. Hydrocodone is classified as an opiate because it is derived from one of the many different narcotic alkaloids found in the opium poppy. There are many different kinds of natural and synthetic opiods that are refined and sold in our nation’s pharmacies and on its street corners. Some of the better known opiates are Morphine, Codeine, Thebaine, Papaverine, Heroin, Hydrocodone, Demerol, Lortab, Oxicodone, OxiContin, Percodan, Percocet, Fentanyl, Sublimaze, Hydromorphone, Dilaudid, and Methadone, and these form the bulk of the prescribed narcotic pain killers as well as some of the most dangerous drugs found in the world.
Opiate drugs cause the user to experience a pleasant drowsy state, a lessened sensation of pain, slowed breathing, and an overall sense of euphoria. Narcotic pain killers work by blocking the path of the chemical messengers that signal pain in the spinal cord and brain.

Most opiate drugs enter the bloodstream easily because they dissolve in fatty substances which allow them to cross into cells and ultimately into the brain. Opiates are water soluble which is very significant when considering how long evidence of their use will stay in your system. Some drug metabolites like THC, which is found in marijuana, are not water soluble, and thus remain in your system for periods of time far greater than water soluble metabolites. When a substance is water soluble, it means that is breaks down and dissolves in water easily. This allows it to exit the fat cells much more rapidly causing any evidence of its usage to vanish in a fraction of the time compared to how long something like THC takes to leave your system. All substances that go through the metabolic process end up having their byproducts stored in the bodies fat cells prior to removal through the body’s excretory system, via urine, sweat, and feces. A person’s body mass index or more commonly, their body fat percentage, is a major factor when considering how long vicodin stays in your system. The more fat a person has in them directly correlates into how many metabolites reside in our body, and hence, how long evidence of vicodin use can still be detected on a drug test. So to be clear, people that carry a higher percentage of body fat will continue to excrete evidence of vicodin usage for significantly longer than someone who is relatively skinny with a low percentage of body fat.

The amount of vicodin taken, the frequency of vicodin use, the length of consistent use, and the strength of the vicodin taken are to also be considered when calculating how long vicodin stays in your system. Obviously the amount of vicodin taken will have a direct correlation on how long it will stay in your system. The more vicodin a person consumes will result in a greater number of metabolites produced, which will be stored in the body’s fat cells. The same logic can be applied when considering the frequency of vicodin usage by a person. Frequent usage of vicodin will cause a constant supply of metabolites to be stored in the body’s fat cells, thus making evidence of vicodin usage detectable for greater periods of time. Another factor to consider is the length of consistent use of vicodin. If you take vicodin often and on a consistent basis, evidence of vicodin use will continue to be detectable for longer periods of time compared to an infrequent user. Vicodin also comes in varying strengths of milligrams. The more potent the vicodin is, the longer it will stay in your system. Most vicodin contains only 5 milligrams of hydrocodone, though some vicodin has up to 10 milligrams and is sold as “Vicodin HP”.

Taking all of these factors into consideration, we can estimate with a clearer degree of certainty how long vicodin will stay in your system. The common perception is that vicodin will only stay in your system for 24 to 48 hours, and this is true in some cases. However, in cases where the user has a high percentage of body fat, or where the user had ingested a more potent vicodin, or when the user is taking vicodin on a more consistent basis, vicodin can still remain in your system for up to 7 days. The graph below presumes vicodin with a hydrocodone concentration of 7.5 milligrams.

Determining how long vicodin can be found in a person’s hair is a little easier to predict. Human hair is like a record of what we eat, drink, inhale, and even where we live. As mentioned earlier, vicodin metabolites are stored in the fat and eventually excreted through our urine and feces. The presence of vicodin metabolites in the hair is based on the same premise. The bloodstream circulates metabolites throughout the body, and since the bloodstream nourishes developing hair follicles, metabolites are deposited in the hair follicle and the hair shaft where they become trapped and then grow out with the hair. Hair grows on average of about ½ inch every 30 days. If your hair is 1½ inches long, vicodin and its metabolites can be detected for up to 90 days. If you have long hair, vicodin will be detectable for quite a long time, at least until you cut your hair and start all over again.